You’re listening to Direct Colors Podcast Episode 39 – DCI Tinted Concrete Sealer for Fast, Easy Affordable Floor Renovation. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for joining us. We’re excited to be joined today by a local contractor, Cat Palmer with TCB Construction in McLoud, OK. Cat’s specialty is giving second life to damaged, distressed and downright ugly concrete floors. We frequently feature her floor renovation projects on our Facebook page and website. She’s here to tell us about the products she uses and the magic touch she brings to her work. Let’s hear from her how she gets the job done! Welcome to the podcast, Cat.

CP:  Thanks for having me on today.

ST: Tell us a bit about yourself and your company, TCB Construction.

CP:  In 2003, I started my business as “Creating Concrete Designs” focused on decorative flooring; however, with much success and growth a name change was necessary to accommodate all the services TCB Construction now offers.

ST:  So, Cat, you’re known for taking on troubled concrete floors and turning them around. Tell us how you do your floor renovation projects.

CP: Years of practice (haha)… but I do have a special eye for turning troubled concrete floors around. I’m not afraid to turn troubled floors into a beautiful statement. I like the challenge, and with each one I grow in knowledge in the field. In this line of work, one must be willing to try new things, and not afraid to tackle any job, no matter if it’s a new slab of concrete, an old dilapidated and cracked floor, or a horrible mess that needs major rehabilitation. My knowledge of the many different chemicals and materials, and how they work together, is also a key to our success.

Tinted-Sealer-Floor-Renovation

Floor Renovation Projects Featuring Tinted Sealer and DCI Concrete Dye

ST:  What recommendations do have for DIYers with difficult floor or patio remodeling projects to help them get the best possible results?

CP: Everyone has a dream picture they find on the web; however, you have to keep in mind no two floors will ever be exactly the same when recreating. My advice is go in simple and follow the steps “exactly to a T”. Always test the concrete slab before moving forward with deciding on product to use. If a concrete slab already has product down, be sure you remove any product and clean the substrate thoroughly before adding any decorative concrete products and chemicals. Omitting critical surface prep steps can create bigger issues to overcome later. If you have ideas about the finished look, such as a picture from the Direct Colors Photo Galleries, share that with the Direct Colors staff or with your contractor to help them select the right products and give the best application advise possible for your project.

ST:  What are you favorite Direct Colors products to work with?

CP:  There are three different Sealers that I like working with. The water based sealer is odorless and it’s an easy application. I love the shine that the AC 1315 high gloss sealer gives but I do not recommend just anyone use this sealer, especially if one is going to be staying in the home during the project.

Concrete can be mixed cheaply with additives added which can result in spackling and chipping of the concrete in due time; but, the durability and appearance of the DCI Lithium Penetrating Hardener Sealer adds great protection and strength to the concrete and brings a great natural look to the surface protecting the concrete for many years to come.

When working with different color applications, for example, Tinted Water Based Sealer and DCI Concrete Dyes.  Each product comes in an array of colors and when used correctly delivers a beautiful outcome for any slab of concrete. Tinted Sealer and Concrete Dye color applications are my go-to for any concrete slab.

ST: Finally, there aren’t a lot of women working professionally in the decorative concrete contracting. What words of wisdom would you offer to women considering working as a contractor for a living?

CP:  Be confident in your knowledge and skill. I think woman make better Decorative Concrete Artisans because they are more in-tuned to the necessary prepping steps and how valuable these steps are to the outcome of the project.

Be prepared to take a chance. Hold your head high, hands on your hips and know that your decorative concrete artistic skill is a gift! They can always reach out to me or Direct Colors for support. Always ask first, if not sure. I love the support I get from the staff at Direct Colors. After 15-years, my knowledge has reached a level of Master Artisan; however, it is just as challenging as it was in the beginning. I Love this about this profession always creating a new floor master piece or correcting a trouble floor. Every job opportunity with Decorative Concrete is as it was in the beginning, gut wrenching until the final sealer goes on. If you follow the necessary steps, and be precise, taking a chance can only be good and you will grow in knowledge and confidence with each floor completed. Concrete Art – turning concrete into a beautiful floor!

ST: Thanks for those words of wisdom both on turning around difficult concrete floor renovation projects and to women considering decorative concrete contracting for a living. If you have questions, call one of our expert technicians at 877-255-2656 and we’ll help you select the best products and technique for your needs.  If you prefer email, send in a free online design consultation and we’ll get back to you within 24-48 hours.

Direct Colors DIY Home Improvement podcasts are produced twice monthly for your enjoyment and show notes can be found at directcolors.com/listen.  Feel free to add the podcast to your favorite RSS feed.  You can also follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ , YouTube and Instagram. I’m Tyler Thompson and thanks again for joining us!

Step-by-step how-to instructions on pouring and stamping colored concrete for new construction. See how it’s done before you start your own integrally colored concrete project. Footage courtesy of Link Cowen Homes in Shawnee, OK. For…

You’re listening to DIRECTCOLORS.COM/LISTEN podcast episode number 24. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for coming. I’m Tommy Carter and today we’re talking about acid staining floors during the construction. As acid stained floors have become more popular, homeowners need to know when to acid stain and what to do to protect the finish throughout the construction process. Shawna Turner, General Manager, with Direct Colors is here to give us the scoop on new construction staining projects. Welcome, Shawna.

ST: Thank you very much

Tommy C: What’s the first thing to keep in mind when acid staining floors in a new construction home?

ST:  Probably the first thing is to make sure your General Contractor knows and understands that you plan to acid stain the floors. If he or she knows in advance, they can properly direct the ready-mix company pouring and finishing the concrete as well as other building contractors to act accordingly.

Tommy C: What role does the pouring and finishing of the concrete play in successfully acid staining?

ST: If you plan to acid stain concrete, the mix should contain no more than 10% fly ash and should only be lightly machine troweled if at all. The concrete should be rich in cement content and the pores open for the stain to readily absorb and react. As long as the GC knows in advance, these requests should not be difficult or costly to implement.

Tommy C: When should a homeowner plan to acid stain their concrete during construction?

ST: The concrete should be allowed to cure for 30 days for best staining results. If at all possible, the concrete should be stained after the dry wall has been hung but BEFORE it has been mudded in. The reason this is so important is that dry wall mud is a very challenging contaminant to remove from concrete after the fact. Homeowners wishing to acid stain their floors are then forced to spend a lot to time and money cleaning that could have been entirely avoided. Spray insulation is also a problem. Spray insulation should be installed AFTER the floors have been covered with overlapping cardboard. The chemicals interfere with the staining and sealing process and are notoriously difficult to remove.

Tommy C: Just to be clear, could you give us the step by step process from acid staining to waxing?

ST:  Sure. That’s a good idea. Once the dry wall has been hung, clean the floors thoroughly using a medium to heavy duty organic degreaser and water solution. All debris, particularly chalk lines, paint, oil stains, dirt and the like, has to be off the surface and out of the pores before you begin. Sanding may be necessary for stubborn debris and staining. When the floors are clean and dry, apply the stain, neutralize and clean according to the instructions. Leave the floor to dry. At this point, you really only want to apply one coat of sealer. I recommend our Sprayable Satin Finish Sealer, especially if you’re working in the winter months. It does have a strong odor during application but can be sprayed on floors freezing and above.

Tommy C: Why just one coat of sealer at this stage?

ST: Even when you cover the floors with overlapping cardboard, damage can still be done during construction. Once the work is complete and the floor cleaned, another coat of sealer can be applied to repair any existing damage and make the floor look brand new again. The sprayable satin finish or AC1315 High Gloss are both solvent-based and have the ability to re-emulsify the acrylic for a smooth final coat.

Tommy C: So what are the final steps after applying the sealer?

ST: After the sealer has been successfully applied, allow the concrete to dry for at least 10 hours before covering with overlapping cardboard. DO NOT TAPE THE CARDBOARD TO THE FLOOR. Tape will bond with the sealer and ruin the finish. Keep the floor covered until construction is complete and the baseboards are ready for placement. At this point, you’re ready to remove the cardboard, clean the floor and apply your final coat of concrete sealer. Allow for 24-48 hours ventilation and dry time before applying the concrete wax and floor polish according to the instructions.

Next step: Enjoy your Floors!

Tommy C: Thank you, Shawna, for that detailed information about acid staining floors during construction. I know it’s a common planning question with our DIY customers. Check out our blog for more on the Care and Maintenance for Acid Stained Floors and other decorative concrete flooring projects.

Tommy C: directcolors.com/listen includes podcasts on many decorative concrete topics so visit our podcast library for past episodes and check back frequently to see what’s new in the world of DIY decorative concrete! Thank you for listening.

If you have questions, call one of our expert technicians at 877-255-2656 and we’ll help you select the best products and technique for your needs.  If you prefer email, send in a free online design consultation and we’ll get back to you within 24-48 hours. Direct Colors DIY Home Improvement podcasts are produced twice monthly for your enjoyment and show notes can be found at directcolors.com/listen.  Feel free to add the podcast to your favorite RSS feed.  You can also follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ , YouTube and Instagram.  I’m Tommy Carter and thank you for joining us!

Tommy C: You’re listening to DIRECTCOLORS.COM/LISTEN Podcast Episode 27, How-to Successfully Acid Stain Side by Side Concrete Slabs Poured at Different Times. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for listening.  I’m Tommy Carter, Sales Manager and Technician with Direct Colors. It may sound odd that concrete poured at different times would not acid stain the same but if you’ve added on to your patio, interior floors or driveway, this podcast is worth the time spent listening! Here to tell you more about why and how to get the best results from your next DIY project is Shawna Turner, General Manager with Direct Colors. Welcome to the podcast, Shawna.

Shawna T:  Thank you.

TC:  Let’s get started. So why does it matter if side by side concrete slabs are poured at different times if you’re planning to acid stain?

ST: Acid Stain is a chemically-reactive stain not just a topical colorant. The stain relies on the minerals available in the concrete surface to react properly and develop the variable, rich color acid stain is known for. Concrete is not mixed exactly the same way every time and the mineral content can vary substantially from one batch to another.  Concrete finishing, especially if a machine trowel is involved, can alter acid staining results dramatically from one floor section to another as well. Keep in mind that exposure to the elements can impact color development on older outdoor concrete slabs. In addition, concrete patches will also stain differently from the surrounding concrete and should be given special consideration before beginning a project. More to this subject than you thought, I suspect.

TC:  For sure!  What recommendations would you make for indoor floors poured separately or patched due to plumbing problems or for carpet tack holes for example?

ST: For indoor floors, making sure the profile is the same across the slab is important. Whether you choose to mechanically profile the floor using a sander or chemically profile with our Hard Troweled Floor Prep, do the same thing everywhere. I recommend reading over page one of our How to Acid Stain Concrete Guide to determine what process will yield the best results for your concrete before beginning. As for concrete patches, they can be tricky particularly if they are in a conspicuous area of the floor. Patches should be sanded flush with the floor before staining. For best results, I would stain and neutralize the rest of the floor first leaving the patch to be stained afterwards so it can be more easily color matched by carefully controlling the stain’s activation time.  Once the patch achieves the same color as the floor, neutralize the stain and move on to the cleaning step. Spray both the patch and the floor with water from a handheld spray bottle to determine when the matching color has been achieved prior to neutralizing.  Keep in mind that we offer topical stains, such as DCI Concrete Dye and Liquid Colored Antique Concrete Stain, to touch up or further accent any difficult areas so don’t worry, there’s more than one path to a beautiful floor.

TC:  That’s good news. What about outdoor concrete?

Many homes have patio and driveway slabs poured at different times. If you want the concrete to be as close to the same color as possible, I suggest applying the stain to the older slab first and leaving it to process for up to 10 hours for maximum color development. The longer concrete is exposed to the elements, the more surface mineral erosion occurs. For this reason, older concrete needs more processing time to achieve optimal color results than a newer slab. After the processing time is complete, neutralize the concrete and rinse so you can get a good look at the color. At this point, apply the stain to the newer slab and leave to process for 2-3 hours.  Using a spray bottle of water, dampen a small area of the old and new concrete and compare.  If it looks like a good match when wet, great. Neutralize and clean the entire slab in preparation for sealing. If not, let the new concrete process for another hour and repeat the test until a color match is achieved. Remember to look at the concrete only when it’s wet not dry. Dry, acid stained concrete does very little to reveal the final color as it will appear when sealed.

TC:  What happens if a color match can’t be achieved with the acid stain? What else can be done?

ST:  As I mentioned before, we have several topical stain options for indoor and outdoor use. I most frequently recommend our Liquid Colored Antique Concrete Stain for patios, driveways and other outdoor concrete. It can be used as a stand-alone concrete stain and often is or as an accent for acid stained concrete. If a satisfactory color match isn’t achievable, Liquid Colored Antique can be applied to blend the colors and create a more uniform final result. Customers often use this to color match on existing stained outdoor slabs where repairs have been made. It’s really an excellent, easy to use product that can renew color, fix problem areas and save customers a great deal of money by avoiding unnecessary tear-outs and refinishing.

TC:  That’s great to hear. Everyone likes to save time and money on home improvement and want to successfully acid stain concrete slabs. Thanks, Shawna, for the helpful tips on how to get the best results when acid staining interior floors and outdoor concrete. I’m sure this will useful information for many of our customers.

DIRECTCOLORS.COM/LISTEN DIY Home Improvement podcasts are produced twice monthly for your enjoyment and show notes can be found at DIRECTCOLORS.COM/LISTEN. Feel free to add the podcast to your favorite RSS feed.  You can also follow us on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ and Instagram. I’m Tommy Carter and thanks again for joining us!

You’re listening to Direct Colors podcast Episode 34:  Q&A  Customers Ask Top Acid Staining Questions If this is your first time listening, then thanks for listening.  I’m Shawna Turner, General Manager with Direct Colors.

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You’re listening to Direct Colors podcast episode 31: Fast, Easy Basement Floor Color Options.  We’re talking about finishing basement and interior concrete floors in the fastest, easiest and more cost effective way possible. If this is your first time listening, then thanks for listening.  I’m Tommy Carter, Sales Manager and Technician with Direct Colors.

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